Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, How Is It Recognised And How Is It Treated?

CFS has been recognised by leading health information organisations as a clinical condition; however there is huge controversy in the medical community as to which is the best way of diagnosing this illness. The cause of CFS is still unknown although researchers believe that some of the contributing factors could be viruses, hypotension, immune impairment and hormonal problems. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome can develop after a viral infection. Some viruses and infections that may possibly be linked to CFS include:

• Human herpes virus six
• Ross River virus
• Epstein-Barr
• Human retroviruses such as HIV
• Mycoplasma
• Rubella (German measles)
• Candida Albicans

The symptoms vary from one person to another and include:

• Fatigue
• Loss of memory or concentration
• Feeling un-refreshed after sleep
• Muscular pain
• Headaches
• Multi-joint pain without redness or swelling
• Frequent sore throat
• Tender lymph nodes in your neck and armpits

If you suffer from CFS you possibly won’t look physically ill and the symptoms are common to many other illnesses. A diagnosis will usually follow severe fatigue of six months or longer with at least four of the symptoms before ruling out other causes. To assist with the treatment of CFS there are a few options listed below:

• limit the intake of caffeine, nicotine and alcohol which aids in improved sleep
• avoid sleeping during the day
• go to bed at the same time every day and wake up at the same or similar time
• pace yourself during activities
• take time to relax and partake in activities that you enjoy
• seek psychological counselling to cope
• physical therapy

People most affected by Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) are women between the ages of 30 and 50 and overweight or inactive people. If you feel you suffer from CFS discuss this with your Doctor as soon as possible.

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